Accurate Temperature Control: The Davy Crockett has better temperature control that permits us to program a great deal more correct temperatures (one-degree changes possible) using their application (the control board permits us to alter temperatures 5 degrees at any given moment). It uses a PID controller […] controller to expect and fine micromanage the temperature by controlling the wood screw speed and the fan speed.


This ceramic Kamado grill is a thing of beauty that combines function and efficiency. It features a heavy-duty ceramic outer body with foldable bamboo shelves on each side, a cast iron damper that lets you control the temperature for cooking, and versatile cooking space with two layers of steel grates. Like ancient Kamados, it uses charcoal for fuel, and has an automated control dial that lets you increase or decrease the temperature inside the grill. The interior of the grill is well-insulated, resulting in well-cooked and flavorful meat every time. With around 567 square inch of cooking space and an extra grate made of stainless steel, you can easily prepare a feast for your family or friends.
A positive Pit Boss attribute we observed, but couldn't explain or verify was that everything we cooked seemed to come out remarkably moist and juicy. The only apparent unique features we saw were the arched drip plate and lack of flame diffuser. Our science advisor, Dr. Greg Blonder, doubted the arched plate was a factor, but observed, "The odd firepot arrangement might cause a circulating airflow pattern, which could affect the humidity bubble around meat".
There's something about wood and wood chip grills that gas and electric grills just can't replace. They can provide that little extra flavor or pop that only wood-smoking and grilling can provide. Unfortunately, that also means wood chip grills can be a little more on the expensive side. Thankfully, Walmart has just the deal if you want the kind of quality barbecue you'd find from some great joints at home.
The first 820 Deluxe Pit Boss sent was defective. It made a loud clanging sound and visibly shook with each clang. It quickly became obvious that something was wrong with the auger. Pit Boss took it back and sent another that worked fine. The exact reason for the clanging was never adequately explained. Recognizing the popularity of Pit Boss and lack of substantive complaints by owners, we give them the benefit of the doubt and are willing to accept this problem was an anomaly. We could not find any other account of a similar issue with Pit Boss, and indeed, the vast majority of buyers seem pleased.
So if I am going to take a pass on the Pit Boss then why not get a Traeger?  A lot of folks are introduced to this brand through the infomercials for the Traeger Renegade Elite.  And while the Elite and other models like the Tailgater are fine cookers I am not going to recommend a Traeger for the exact same reason that you are thinking about a Pit Boss.

GrillGrates(TM) amplify heat, prevent flareups, make flipping foods easier, keep small foods from committing suicide, kill hotspots, are easier to clean, flip over to make a fine griddle, and can be easily removed and moved from one grill to another. You can even throw wood chips, pellets, or sawdust between the rails and deliver a quick burst of smoke to whatever is above. Every gas grill needs them.
Pit Boss sent us their largest, top of the line 820 Deluxe model to test. Deluxe models have an attractive copper colored lid, neat stainless steel removable serving tray that also functions like a side shelf and built-in bottle opener. Standard models use a typical flame diffuser over the firepot and a flat drip pan right beneath the grates that is angled to divert drippings into a grease bucket hanging from the right side.
We just bought a 700 today and am very frustrated. We sat for 4 hours trying to maintain the temperature. On smoke, it went as high as 450 and stayed.. and this continued on every temperature we tried. We set the “p” setting to all the different possibilities.. We finally gave up after trying to get it to maintain a 250 degree temp.. it kept going over 400.. I don’t understand and not to happy tonight. Anyone have these issues?
My first run was a warm day with little wind and the temperature held +/- 15*…about the same as an oven and much more steady than sticks, chips, or charcoal. It is remarkably efficient. I have smoked twice and grilled once and haven’t used but maybe 10lbs of pellets (I have been using the Competition Blend Pit Boss Pellets ($20 at WalMart for 40 lbs) . WAY, WAY cheaper than charcoal to run (and almost no ash!). There is all of this talk about PID controllers in pits, and I don’t know if this pit has one or not, but if not, that talk is overrated in my opinion, because I can’t imagine needing any tighter control. The pit also has “P” value setting that allows you to trade a wider temperature variance for more smoke and less pellet usage. I haven’t played with that yet, but it sounds intriguing (it comes factory set in the middle).
×